Less than 10% of historical forest cover

remains on Leeward Haleakalā.

Over the last 200 years, overgrazing by feral cows, pigs and goats as well as the introduction of invasive plant species and disease has decimated our native ecosystems on the mountain.

Data: EcoAdapt, 2017;  HAWP: 30 by 30 Watershed Forests Target

Only 15% of priority watershed lands in Hawai'i are currently protected.

A disease like Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death could wipe out dominant trees in our native forests, and affect their capacity to recharge water.

Learn how to decontaminate your boots and gear!

Maui is experiencing greater numbers of consecutive dry days, especially at higher elevations, increasing risk of fire.

Maui’s groundwater base flow is decreasing.

We are experiencing more intense rain events due to a warmer atmosphere – however, in Hawai‘i overall rainfall has declined.

Recognizing an opportunity to reverse the reduction of native forested lands, our coalition of landowners and agencies has partnered with volunteers to make positive change for our leeward watersheds.

43,175

Acres of Watershed Lands

Managed in Partnership

122,000

Native Seedlings Planted

12,080

Seedballs made by Maui students

13.5

Miles of fences maintained to protect native ecosystems

HELP US BRING BACK

THE FOREST

watersheds & ecosystems

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native biodiversity

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cultural

resources

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economic

diversity

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community

engagement

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Video Filmed & Produced by local keiki in programs with the Maui Huliau Foundation, which was founded to provide unique environmental education programs to Maui's youth.

 
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© 2018 by LHWRP.

A project of the Research Corporation of the

University of Hawai‘i (RCUH)

Mahalo to Hawai'i Tourism Authority (HTA) for funding website development.

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CONTACT

Address: 3620 Baldwin Avenue

Suite 202/203
Makawao, HI 96768

Phone: (808) 573-8989